51ST AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE SQUADRON

51st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron

51st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron


Mission

The 51st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron provides combat-ready aircraft for the Air Force's most forward deployed permanently-based fighter wing. As the most permanently forward-deployed flightline maintenance squadron in the world, it is responsible for conducting on-and-off equipment maintenance for A-10C Thunderbolt IIs and F-16CM Fighting Falcon aircraft valued at $1.1 billion. It is one of four squadrons assigned to the 51st Maintenance Group, 51st Fighter Wing, Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The squadron consists of two Aircraft Maintenance Units (AMUs).
The 51st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron trains hard to defend the Republic of Korea and support the wing's motto "Ready to Fight and Win Tonight!"

HISTORY

The 51 AMXS was first activated on Aug. 18, 1948, at Naha Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, and was responsible for all aircraft maintenance on the wing's F-80A and F-80C Shooting Star aircraft. On Sept. 25, 1950, the squadron deployed to Itazuke Air Base, Japan, after the invasion of South Korea. Between October 1950 and October 1952, it moved five more times. From August 1951, the squadron was an integral part of maintenance operations at Tsuiki Air Base, Japan. Between 1951 and 1953, squadron Airmen performed intermediate and depot-level maintenance repairs on F-80s and F-86 Sabers.

The 51 AMXS returned to Naha Air Base by Aug. 1, 1954, where it remained for the next 17 years. Airmen worked on the F-86D and F-102A Delta Daggers at Naha, but also deployed to South Vietnam, Taiwan, and South Korea for contingency operations. The squadron was inactivated on May 31, 1971.

The squadron was reactivated on Sept. 20, 1974, at Osan Air Base, South Korea, as the 51st Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron and given a multi-aircraft support role. Early in 1978, it became the 51st Aircraft Generation Squadron as it performed on-line, aircraft maintenance under the Deputy Commander for Maintenance. This mission continued through the 1990s until the squadron was inactivated in February 1992. On Sept. 30, 2002, the squadron was reactivated as the 51st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron under the Combat Wing concept. During its 35+ years at Osan Air Base, Airmen have performed maintenance on four different combat aircraft: F-4E Phantom II, OV-10 Branco, A/OA-10, and F-16C/D.

Airmen assigned to the 51st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (AMXS) have provided the 51st Fighter Wing with aircraft maintenance support for nearly 64 years during periods of war and peace. It is the oldest squadron assigned to the 51st Maintenance Group.

Throughout six decades of service, the squadron experienced one inactivation and six re-designations largely due to organizational or mission changes. The squadron has earned 9 Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards and one Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation.


51 AMXS Aircraft Maintenance Unit (AMU) Information

25 AMU - "Mighty 25, PILSUNG"
This 25th AMU directs all production efforts of maintenance personnel assigned to the A-10C aircraft and equipment. They analyze maintenance performance indicators to identify adverse trends and recommend corrective actions to 51st Fighter Wing leadership. They coordinate with the 25th Fighter Squadron to maximize pilot training, maintain aircraft fleet health, and execute an annual flying hour program. Additionally, the 25th AMU oversees all training of assigned personnel to support peacetime and contingency operations on the Korean peninsula.

36 AMU - "Harrumph"
The 36th AMU directs all production efforts of maintenance personnel assigned to the F-16CM aircraft and equipment. They analyze maintenance performance indicators to identify adverse trends and recommend corrective actions to 51st Fighter Wing leadership. They coordinate with the 36th Fighter Squadron to maximize pilot training, maintain aircraft fleet health, and execute an annual flying hour program. The 36th AMU oversees all training of assigned personnel to support peacetime and contingency operations on the Korean peninsula.