Every Airman to be a Defender

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --  Getting their faces in the dirt, Airman practice low-crawling during the Installation Arming and Response course. In this course, Airmen E-1 through E-6 will be taught how to defend against, deny and delay opposing forces. The January and future exercises will use the method to provide defense of the base. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Kim Schaerdel)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Getting their faces in the dirt, Airman practice low-crawling during the Installation Arming and Response course. In this course, Airmen E-1 through E-6 will be taught how to defend against, deny and delay opposing forces. The January and future exercises will use the method to provide defense of the base. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Kim Schaerdel)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Leading the charge, the 51st Security Forces Squadron is first in the Air Force to offer the Installation Arming and Response program.

The IAR program provides ground combat skills training to all Airmen on how to defend, detect, deny and delay opposing forces.

With this training, every Airman plays a defensive role for the base. Graduates of the course will be able to report attacks, set-up entry control points, and protect themselves, their unit's personnel, resources and infrastructure. Airmen E-1 through E-6 and company grade officers will be required to attend this course.

With the drawback in military personnel across the Air Force, security forces is no exception to feeling the blow in terms of manning.

The two-day course builds on the ground combat skills expected of every Airmen in order to more effectively and decisively defend Osan.

The course is comprised of in-class sessions and practical training. During the classroom portion, students learn the fundamental rules and procedures of base security.

"The classroom information gives students the background knowledge to perform during the practical phase," said 1st Lt. Jonathon Murray, wartime operations officer for the 51st Security Forces Squadron. "The students take the rules that dictate when and how to correctly use force and bring this knowledge to the force-on-force scenarios."

During the practical training, students get their faces in the dirt. They practice tactical movements and learn "shoot, move and communicate." Students handle the M-16 rifle to become better familiar with rifle fighting and how to engage their weapon.

At the end of this two-day course, the class splits in half to conduct force-on-force exercises. They use what they learned to either secure or attack a compound.

Under the old base defense plan, a varied number of Airmen were pulled from their units for augmentee duty. Airmen were given a one-day Selective Arming course that taught them how to defend their area of responsibility.

"Units on base can't afford to lose members from their shops to fill-in as augmentees," said 1st Lt. Murray. "This program will allow for every Airman to aid in the defense of the base."

The Selective Arming program has been absorbed into the IAR program.

Now, every Airmen will be capable and responsible for detecting and reacting to threats while manning their battle station. This program will free up security force personnel to become a quick reaction force for both inside and outside perimeter threats.

The base will provide security using the IAR training for the upcoming Peninsula Operational Readiness Exercise Jan. 22-26.