Beverly Midnight 16-01: Emergency Management teams respond to simulated CBRNE attacks

Airman 1st Class Benjamin Thompson, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management apprentice, checks simulated M-8 paper for chemicals during exercise Beverly Midnight 16-01 on Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, March 8, 2016. The exercise is used to create realistic training environments for Airmen to practice key skills in the event of real-world contingencies. The emergency management teams are the first to respond after attacks to search for injured personnel, enemy activity and structural damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Airman 1st Class Benjamin Thompson, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management apprentice, checks simulated M-8 paper for chemicals during exercise Beverly Midnight 16-01 on Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, March 8, 2016. The exercise is used to create realistic training environments for Airmen to practice key skills in the event of real-world contingencies. The emergency management teams are the first to respond after attacks to search for injured personnel, enemy activity and structural damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Airmen 1st Class Benjamin Thompson and Justin Eason, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management apprentices, review survey areas during exercise Beverly Midnight 16-01 on Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, March 8, 2016. The emergency management teams are the first to respond after attacks to search for injured personnel, enemy activity and structural damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Airmen 1st Class Benjamin Thompson and Justin Eason, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management apprentices, review survey areas during exercise Beverly Midnight 16-01 on Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, March 8, 2016. The emergency management teams are the first to respond after attacks to search for injured personnel, enemy activity and structural damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Airman 1st Class Benjamin Thompson, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management apprentice, dons his mission-oriented protective posture gear after a simulated attack during exercise Beverly Midnight 16-01 on Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, March 8, 2016. The exercise creates realistic training environments for Airmen to practice key skills in the event of real-world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Airman 1st Class Benjamin Thompson, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management apprentice, dons his mission-oriented protective posture gear after a simulated attack during exercise Beverly Midnight 16-01 on Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, March 8, 2016. The exercise creates realistic training environments for Airmen to practice key skills in the event of real-world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea -- In association with the “Fight tonight” readiness mentality, Osan is known for its high operations tempo and frequent exercises, including the current exercise Beverly Midnight 16-01.

Throughout these exercises, simulated attacks give Osan members the opportunity to prepare for real-world incidents.

After the simulated attacks, a specialized team is called to survey the damage. They are positioned to be first responders on-scene and ensure all is safe before anyone else is put in potential danger.

“We conduct large-scale post attack reconnaissance routes to search for injured personnel, anything suspicious and structural damage,” said Airman 1st Class Benjamin Thompson, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management apprentice. “Once we’ve completed our search, we report to the emergency operations center for further action.”

“Here at Osan, there is a high [Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Enhanced Conventional Weapons] threat due to the North Korean capabilities,” he continued. “Our job is not only vital to ensuring PAR routes are secured, but creating a speedy timeline for aircraft to be put back in the air.”

In addition, the emergency management team trains the base populous for CBRNE responses, including donning mission-oriented protective posture gear, running PAR routes, and inspecting masks.

“We also train the shelter management teams on how to properly utilize collection protective systems and contamination control areas,” said Airman 1st Class Justin Eason, 51st CES emergency management apprentice.

The Airmen in the emergency management flight are highly trained individuals with specialized capabilities creating a safer environment after potential real-world attacks.

“The threats we face here are unlike anywhere else,” said Thompson. “Our job helps to mitigate so many potential hazards and is the tip of the spear when it comes to CBRNE response.”