Osan firefighters train ROK, US soldiers during exercise

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Eric Gayoso, center, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fire prevention crew chief, briefs members of the Joint Security Area Security Battalion on aircraft extraction techniques during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. The firefighters assisted with the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers on how to enter crashed aircraft by cutting through with specialized equipment such as a circular saw and Jaws of Life. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Eric Gayoso, center, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fire prevention crew chief, briefs members of the Joint Security Area Security Battalion on aircraft extraction techniques during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. The firefighters assisted with the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers on how to enter crashed aircraft by cutting through with specialized equipment such as a circular saw and Jaws of Life. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

A U.S. Army Joint Security Area Security Battalion fire team member uses the Jaws of Life to rescue a simulated trapped service member during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. The Jaws of Life is a hydraulic device that is used to pry apart the wreckage of crashed vehicles or aircraft to free people trapped inside. 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fire prevention firefighters assisted in the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers how to safely enter a crashed aircraft to rescue individuals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

A U.S. Army Joint Security Area Security Battalion fire team member uses the Jaws of Life to rescue a simulated trapped service member during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. The Jaws of Life is a hydraulic device that is used to pry apart the wreckage of crashed vehicles or aircraft to free people trapped inside. 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fire prevention firefighters assisted in the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers how to safely enter a crashed aircraft to rescue individuals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

Republic of Korea and U.S. Army Joint Security Area Security Battalion fire team members four-man carry a simulated injured service member during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fire prevention firefighters assisted in the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers how to safely enter a crashed aircraft to rescue individuals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

Republic of Korea and U.S. Army Joint Security Area Security Battalion fire team members four-man carry a simulated injured service member during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fire prevention firefighters assisted in the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers how to safely enter a crashed aircraft to rescue individuals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Eric Gayoso, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fire prevention crew chief, and Master Sgt. Darnell Walls, 51st CES NCO in charge of training, speak with U.S. Army Lt. Col. Christopher Nyland, Joint Security Area Security Battalion commander, during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. 51st CES fire prevention firefighters assisted in the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers how to safely enter a crashed aircraft to rescue individuals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Eric Gayoso, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fire prevention crew chief, and Master Sgt. Darnell Walls, 51st CES NCO in charge of training, speak with U.S. Army Lt. Col. Christopher Nyland, Joint Security Area Security Battalion commander, during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. 51st CES fire prevention firefighters assisted in the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers how to safely enter a crashed aircraft to rescue individuals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

A U.S. Army Joint Security Area Security Battalion fire team member uses a circular saw on a simulated aircraft during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. Fire prevention firefighters from the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron participated in the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers how to use the right tools when rescuing people inside of a crashed aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

A U.S. Army Joint Security Area Security Battalion fire team member uses a circular saw on a simulated aircraft during a joint search and recovery exercise April 8, 2016, at Camp Bonifas, Republic of Korea. Fire prevention firefighters from the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron participated in the exercise by teaching ROK and U.S. Soldiers how to use the right tools when rescuing people inside of a crashed aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dillian Bamman/Released)

CAMP BONIFAS, Republic of Korea --

Firefighters from the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron assisted Joint Security Area service members with rescue tools and safety precautions during a joint exercise April 8, here.

Republic of Korea and U.S. Army members practiced search and recovery techniques after a simulated aircraft crash north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone.

“This exercise is to show that our soldiers have the skills necessary to extract and treat casualties from the aircraft and to get to that aircraft safely to an area that is potentially mined or has unexploded ordnance,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Christopher Nyland, United Nations Command Security Battalion commander.

Every month, the United Nations Command exercises their right to train in accordance to the Korean Armistice Agreement. During this iteration, the security battalion called upon the Osan fire prevention flight for assistance.

“They have been helping us make sure we have the right tools in our toolkit … and to train these soldiers and our leaders on how to gain entry into a crashed aircraft,” said Nyland. “They were able to join us on this exercise and provide their observations and critique on how well we’re using these lessons and applying them in a tactical scenario. We’ve really opened our aperture on how to utilize these tools thanks to them.”

The exercise incorporated a wooden structure filled with simulated injured service members to simulate a downed helicopter. Security battalion soldiers used their new equipment like a circular saw and Jaws of Life to enter the aircraft safely and without further injuring the individuals inside.

“In a perfect world, a downed helicopter will land straight down, but oftentimes that is not the case,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Nathaniel Andrews, 51st CES fire prevention crew chief. “We’re here to ensure they’re able to work around situations like this to save lives. Our big part of this exercise is making sure these soldiers are able to safely enter the downed aircraft and extricate patients for medical help.”

“For example, if someone is pinned inside the aircraft, you could use the Jaws of Life to pry open the cuts made with a saw to ensure we don’t further injure the individuals,” he added.

“I’m glad we were able to come out and train with the Army,” said Andrews. “Especially coming up to Camp Bonifas, where the threat is real. Helping them out with this certainly shows the strong alliance we have here.”

The Osan fire prevention team plans to continue participation in exercises with the JSA Security Battalion to ensure the peace and stability on the Korea Peninsula.