Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2 kicks off at Osan

An Andros F6 robot is used to relay information to a remote explosive ordnance disposal team assigned to the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron during Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Aug. 23, 2016. The robot uses several cameras to give its operators a clear view of what they are working on, and the EOD Airmen use exercises like these to hone their technical skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Victor J. Caputo)

An Andros F6 robot is used to relay information to a remote explosive ordnance disposal team assigned to the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron during Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Aug. 23, 2016. The robot uses several cameras to give its operators a clear view of what they are working on, and the EOD Airmen use exercises like these to hone their technical skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Victor J. Caputo)

An Andros F6 robot approaches an improvised explosive device in the back of a vehicle at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Aug. 23, 2016. The 51st Civil Engineer squadron explosive ordnance team responded to reports of a suspicious vehicle during Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Victor J. Caputo)

An Andros F6 robot approaches an improvised explosive device in the back of a vehicle at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Aug. 23, 2016. The 51st Civil Engineer squadron explosive ordnance team responded to reports of a suspicious vehicle during Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Victor J. Caputo)

A simulated improvised explosive device sits in the back of a vehicle at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Aug. 23, 2016. The 51st Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance explosive team was called out to inspect the suspicious device, kicking off the first event in Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Victor J. Caputo)

A simulated improvised explosive device sits in the back of a vehicle at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Aug. 23, 2016. The 51st Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance explosive team was called out to inspect the suspicious device, kicking off the first event in Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Victor J. Caputo)

Four A-10 Thunderbolt IIs fly in formation over Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Aug. 23, 2016. The A-10s, all assigned to the 25th Fighter Squadron, return to base after flying a training sortie, and will continue flying sorties all week as part of Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Victor J. Caputo)

Four A-10 Thunderbolt IIs fly in formation over Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Aug. 23, 2016. The A-10s, all assigned to the 25th Fighter Squadron, return to base after flying a training sortie, and will continue flying sorties all week as part of Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Victor J. Caputo)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --

Exercise Beverly Herd 16-2, a quarterly exercise flexing Team Osan’s war-fighting muscles, kicked off Aug. 23.

The base-wide exercise tests each unit’s ability to conduct their wartime mission successfully and be prepared to ‘fight tonight’.

“It is extremely important that we consistently exercise our abilities like this, keeping our strengths up and minimizing any weaknesses we find,” said Col. Cary Culbertson, 51st Fighter Wing vice commander.

One of the first events of the exercise involved an explosive ordnance disposal team from the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron responding to a suspicious vehicle in a parking lot. The EOD Airmen cleared the area by using their Andros F6 robot to inspect chemicals and suspicious objects found in the back of the vehicle.

“In the real world, we have to be able to work flawlessly so we can provide risk-based [recommendations] to the commander,” said Chief Master Sgt. Frank Roman, 51st Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management flight chief.

The week-long exercise is conducted throughout the entire base, but the focus is often on unit-level objectives and capability checks.

“The ability of our squadrons to accomplish their mission is the most fundamental part of Team Osan’s ‘Fight Tonight’ capabilities,” said Culbertson. “Whether it’s building the armaments, generating the aircraft or securing the base, the skill and aptitude of our ground-level Airmen and NCOs determines how effective we can be in a wartime scenario.”