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US Air Force F-22 Raptors arrive at Osan AB

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, is flanked by an F-16 Fighting Falcon and a Republic of Korea air force F-15 Slam Eagle at Osan Air Base, ROK, Feb. 17,2016. The Raptor was part of a flyover formation of 12 aircraft demonstrating the strength of the ROK/U.S. alliance in response to recent provocative actions by North Korea. 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, is flanked by an F-16 Fighting Falcon and a Republic of Korea air force F-15 Slam Eagle at Osan Air Base, ROK, Feb. 17,2016. The Raptor was part of a flyover formation of 12 aircraft demonstrating the strength of the ROK/U.S. alliance in response to recent provocative actions by North Korea. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Song, Kyong Hwan/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Song, Kyong Hwan/Released)

An Air Force Security Forces member stands guard next to an F22 Raptor fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, after it conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. It was joined by three other Raptors, four F-15 Slam Eagles and four U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

An Air Force Security Forces member stands guard next to an F22 Raptor fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, after it conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. It was joined by three other Raptors, four F-15 Slam Eagles and four U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Chief of Staff of the Republic of Korea air force Gen. Jeong, Kyeong-doo (middle) receives a translated briefing from an F-22 Raptor pilot after conducting a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. F-22 Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Chief of Staff of the Republic of Korea air force Gen. Jeong, Kyeong-doo (middle) receives a translated briefing from an F-22 Raptor pilot after conducting a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. F-22 Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Air Force Security Forces members stands guard next to an F22 Raptor fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, after it conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. It was joined by three other Raptors, four F-15 Slam Eagles and four U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Air Force Security Forces members stands guard next to an F22 Raptor fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, after it conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. It was joined by three other Raptors, four F-15 Slam Eagles and four U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, lands after conducting a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, lands after conducting a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, fly over the skies of South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dillian Bamman/Released)
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Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, fly over the skies of South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dillian Bamman/Released)

Airman 1st Class John Williams, 51st Security Forces Squadron defender, watches as Lt. Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy, U.S. Forces Korea deputy commander and U.S. 7th Air Force commander, and Republic of Korea Air Force Lt. Gen. Lee, Wang-Keon, ROK Air Force Operations Command commander, give remarks after a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)
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Airman 1st Class John Williams, 51st Security Forces Squadron defender, watches as Lt. Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy, U.S. Forces Korea deputy commander and U.S. 7th Air Force commander, and Republic of Korea Air Force Lt. Gen. Lee, Wang-Keon, ROK Air Force Operations Command commander, give remarks after a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)
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Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)
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Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)
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Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --

Four U.S. F-22 Raptor fighter aircraft conducted a combined formation flight alongside Republic of Korea F-15K Slam Eagle aircraft and U.S. F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter aircraft to demonstrate the capabilities of the ROK-U.S. Alliance Feb. 17, here.

The F-22 Raptor is the most capable air superiority fighter in the world, and it represents one of many capabilities available for the defense of this great nation. The U.S. maintains an ironclad commitment to the defense of the Republic of Korea,” said United Nations Command, U.S. Forces Korea deputy commander and U.S. 7th Air Force commander, Lt. Gen. Terrence O'Shaughnessy, during a combined press engagement with media.

Republic of Korea Air Force Lt. Gen. Lee Wang-keon, ROK Air Force Operations Command commander, spoke about the strength of the ROK-U.S. Alliance’s air combat capabilities during his brief remarks.

“The ROK and U.S. combined Air Forces remain ready to deter North Korean threats, and are postured to defeat them with the strength of our combined air combat capability,” Lt. Gen. Lee said.

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Nicholas Evans, 36th Fighter Squadron commander, flew alongside the formation, showcasing Osan’s readiness mission.

“The combined nature of this flyover highlighted the high level of integration and interoperability between our two Air Forces, developed through decades of combined training,” said Evans.

“Furthermore, the inclusion of F-22s, and a B-52 in January, demonstrated the firm resolve of all [United States] forces as we stand united with our counterparts from the ROK Air Force,” he added.

The mission demonstrated the strength of the Alliance between the United States and the Republic of Korea and the resolve of both nations to maintain stability on the Korean Peninsula.

US Air Force F-22 Raptors arrive at Osan AB

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, is flanked by an F-16 Fighting Falcon and a Republic of Korea air force F-15 Slam Eagle at Osan Air Base, ROK, Feb. 17,2016. The Raptor was part of a flyover formation of 12 aircraft demonstrating the strength of the ROK/U.S. alliance in response to recent provocative actions by North Korea. 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, is flanked by an F-16 Fighting Falcon and a Republic of Korea air force F-15 Slam Eagle at Osan Air Base, ROK, Feb. 17,2016. The Raptor was part of a flyover formation of 12 aircraft demonstrating the strength of the ROK/U.S. alliance in response to recent provocative actions by North Korea. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Song, Kyong Hwan/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Song, Kyong Hwan/Released)

An Air Force Security Forces member stands guard next to an F22 Raptor fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, after it conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. It was joined by three other Raptors, four F-15 Slam Eagles and four U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

An Air Force Security Forces member stands guard next to an F22 Raptor fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, after it conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. It was joined by three other Raptors, four F-15 Slam Eagles and four U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Chief of Staff of the Republic of Korea air force Gen. Jeong, Kyeong-doo (middle) receives a translated briefing from an F-22 Raptor pilot after conducting a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. F-22 Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Chief of Staff of the Republic of Korea air force Gen. Jeong, Kyeong-doo (middle) receives a translated briefing from an F-22 Raptor pilot after conducting a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. F-22 Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Air Force Security Forces members stands guard next to an F22 Raptor fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, after it conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. It was joined by three other Raptors, four F-15 Slam Eagles and four U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Air Force Security Forces members stands guard next to an F22 Raptor fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, after it conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. It was joined by three other Raptors, four F-15 Slam Eagles and four U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, lands after conducting a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, lands after conducting a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Travis Edwards/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, fly over the skies of South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dillian Bamman/Released)
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Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, fly over the skies of South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dillian Bamman/Released)

Airman 1st Class John Williams, 51st Security Forces Squadron defender, watches as Lt. Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy, U.S. Forces Korea deputy commander and U.S. 7th Air Force commander, and Republic of Korea Air Force Lt. Gen. Lee, Wang-Keon, ROK Air Force Operations Command commander, give remarks after a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)
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Airman 1st Class John Williams, 51st Security Forces Squadron defender, watches as Lt. Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy, U.S. Forces Korea deputy commander and U.S. 7th Air Force commander, and Republic of Korea Air Force Lt. Gen. Lee, Wang-Keon, ROK Air Force Operations Command commander, give remarks after a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)
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Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)
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Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)
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Four U.S. Air Force F-22 "Raptor" fighter aircraft from Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducted a flyover in the vicinity of Osan Air Base, South Korea, in response to recent provocative action by North Korea Feb. 17, 2016. The Raptors were joined by four F-15 Slam Eagles and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons. The F-22 is designed to project air dominance rapidly and at great distances and currently cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin High/Released)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --

Four U.S. F-22 Raptor fighter aircraft conducted a combined formation flight alongside Republic of Korea F-15K Slam Eagle aircraft and U.S. F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter aircraft to demonstrate the capabilities of the ROK-U.S. Alliance Feb. 17, here.

The F-22 Raptor is the most capable air superiority fighter in the world, and it represents one of many capabilities available for the defense of this great nation. The U.S. maintains an ironclad commitment to the defense of the Republic of Korea,” said United Nations Command, U.S. Forces Korea deputy commander and U.S. 7th Air Force commander, Lt. Gen. Terrence O'Shaughnessy, during a combined press engagement with media.

Republic of Korea Air Force Lt. Gen. Lee Wang-keon, ROK Air Force Operations Command commander, spoke about the strength of the ROK-U.S. Alliance’s air combat capabilities during his brief remarks.

“The ROK and U.S. combined Air Forces remain ready to deter North Korean threats, and are postured to defeat them with the strength of our combined air combat capability,” Lt. Gen. Lee said.

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Nicholas Evans, 36th Fighter Squadron commander, flew alongside the formation, showcasing Osan’s readiness mission.

“The combined nature of this flyover highlighted the high level of integration and interoperability between our two Air Forces, developed through decades of combined training,” said Evans.

“Furthermore, the inclusion of F-22s, and a B-52 in January, demonstrated the firm resolve of all [United States] forces as we stand united with our counterparts from the ROK Air Force,” he added.

The mission demonstrated the strength of the Alliance between the United States and the Republic of Korea and the resolve of both nations to maintain stability on the Korean Peninsula.