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Osan engineers, 554th Red Horse Squadron team up for training

Osan engineers, 554th Red Horse Squadron team up for training

U.S. Airmen and Soldiers excavate a repair site during rapid airfield damage recovery (RADR) training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, April 19, 2019. RADR is a quick process used to repair structural damages on an airfield where civil engineers evaluate damages, prepare areas for repair and pour concrete to get the airfield back to mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ramon A. Adelan)

Osan engineers, 554th Red Horse Squadron team up for training

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron fill a repair site with concrete mix during rapid airfield damage recovery (RADR) training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, April 19, 2019. Members assigned to the 554th Red Horse Squadron out of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, trained and evaluated the 51st CES in a week-long training exercise, which ended with the full-on execution of repairing a damaged airfield. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ramon A. Adelan)

Osan engineers, 554th Red Horse Squadron team up for training

A U.S. Airmen assigned to the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron watches concrete pour into a repair site during rapid airfield damage recovery (RADR) training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, April 19, 2019. The 51st CES conducted a realistic RADR training exercise with the assistance of the explosive ordnance disposal flight detonating explosives to create craters on a non-active section of the runway. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ramon A. Adelan)

Osan engineers, 554th Red Horse Squadron team up for training

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Michael Blumer, center, pulls a vibrating screed during rapid airfield damage recovery (RADR) training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, April 19, 2019. RADR is a quick process used to repair damages on an airfield where civil engineers evaluate damages, prepare areas for repair and pour concrete to get the airfield back to mission ready. Blumer is a heating, ventilation and air conditioning apprentice assigned to the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ramon A. Adelan)

Osan engineers, 554th Red Horse Squadron team up for training

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Gardner, left, reviews evaluation notes with a teammate during rapid airfield damage recovery (RADR) training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, April 19, 2019. Engineers from the 554th Red Horse Squadron trained and evaluated the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron, which ended with the full-on execution of repairing a damaged airfield. Gardner is a water fuels management system contingency training instructor assigned to the 554th RHS at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ramon A. Adelan)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --

The 51st Civil Engineer Squadron successfully accomplished rapid airfield damage recovery (RADR) training with assistance from the 554th Red Horse Squadron assigned to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, April 19, 2019, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea.

The RADR training provided a realistic scenario with the help of the explosive ordnance disposal flight detonating explosives to create craters on a non-active section of the runway.

After the explosion, civil engineers evaluated damages, prepared areas for repair and took action to get the airfield back to mission ready.

“Engineers from the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron along with 51st Logistics Readiness Squadron and Soldiers from the 11th Engineer Battalion out of Camp Humphries spent the past week training on Rapid Airfield Damage Recovery processes,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Timothy Fryar, 51st CES commander.  “Airmen TDY from the 554th RED HORSE Squadron provided the training needed to refine our capabilities.  The training ended with a capstone 51st Fighter Wing Exercise on Friday where the team executed all aspects of airfield recovery to include rapid airfield damage assessment, rapid explosive hazard mitigation, followed by rapid damage repair.”

The 51st CES cut, excavated and repaired 12 craters in less than 7 ½ hours.

“Without this training, the time to repair damaged airfields would drastically increase which would prohibit sortie generation for large portions of time,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Nick Saccone, 51st CES deputy commander.

Members of the 554th RHS are considered experts in rapid engineering and uphold the motto, “semper ducimus,” which means, “always leading.”

“Providing such a realistic situation with these engineers gives them an insight to what can occur and how to handle it wherever they’re stationed,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Gardner, 554th RHS water fuels management system contingency training instructor. “We trained them, but more importantly we evaluated them on how they operated to fulfill the demand to get the airfield up and running again.”

Civil engineers at Osan were grateful for the support provided by U.S. Pacific Air Forces’ only Red Horse Squadron. Through working together, the Airmen aim to ensure they’re ready for any challenge should an accident or natural disaster occur.