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BASH keeps Osan's flightline safe

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Kolton Rottinghaus, 51st Fighter Wing Safety Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Hazard manager, fires a shotgun on the flightline at Osan Air Base, Jan. 14, 2021. The BASH program is in place to reduce catastrophic bird strikes. A bird strike can damage an engine, dent a windshield, or even break other parts of an aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

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Kolton Rottinghaus, 51st Fighter Wing Safety Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Hazard manager, removes a shotgun from a vault at Osan Air Base, Jan. 14, 2021. The air space above Osan AB has all kinds of missions, including a program that ensures the safety for both humans and wildlife to co-exist. The BASH program is continuously working to mitigate wildlife hazards, such as bird strikes to the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

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Kolton Rottinghaus, 51st Fighter Wing Safety Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Hazard manager, checks a system of propane noise canons on the flightline at Osan Air Base, Jan. 14, 2021. Loud distress calls and propane canons are used to keep birds out, making sure the flightline is an unattractive area for wildlife. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

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Kolton Rottinghaus, 51st Fighter Wing Safety Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Hazard manager, canvasses the grass to ensure birds and other animals are not nesting on the flightline at Osan Air Base, Jan. 14, 2021. Along with managing birds with loud noise, the flightline grass is also kept at a specific uniform height between 7 to 14 inches. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

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Kolton Rottinghaus, 51st Fighter Wing Safety Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Hazard manager, cleans his shotgun after a day of use at Osan Air Base, Jan. 14, 2021. The BASH program classifies a bird strike as a collision between a bird and an aircraft, but the term is often expanded to cover other wildlife strikes. Other wildlife can include bats and ground animals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

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Kolton Rottinghaus, 51st Fighter Wing Safety Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Hazard manager, cleans a shotgun at Osan Air Base, Jan. 14, 2021. The BASH program ensures the 51st FW mission readiness and combat capability by providing the safest flying environment possible. The program is designed to reduce risk to aircrews, aircraft, and the surrounding community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Kolton Rottinghaus, 51st Fighter Wing Safety Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Hazard manager, fires a shotgun on the flightline at Osan Air Base, Jan. 14, 2021. The BASH program is in place to reduce catastrophic bird strikes. A bird strike can damage an engine, dent a windshield, or even break other parts of an aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)