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51st CS Airmen ‘wired up, fired up’ for resiliency training event

Staff Sgt. Tyler McNaughton, 51st Communications Squadron radio frequency transmission supervisor, operates a Very Small Aperture Antenna (VSAT) during a resiliency exercise at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021.

Staff Sgt. Tyler McNaughton, 51st Communications Squadron radio frequency transmission supervisor, operates a Very Small Aperture Antenna (VSAT) during a resiliency exercise at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021. the objective of the exercise was to test and validate the 51st Fighter Wing’s Communications Flyaway Kit (CFK). The Fly-Away Kit is designed to allow the user to maintain communications while on the move or at a stationary remote station. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Allison Payne)

Staff Sgt. Dean Sigismundo, 51st Communications Squadron radio frequency transmission supervisor, begins the power down process on the Ground Multiband Terminal (GMT) at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021.

Staff Sgt. Dean Sigismundo, 51st Communications Squadron radio frequency transmission supervisor, begins the power down process on the Ground Multiband Terminal (GMT) at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021. The GMT is an interoperable, deployable, dual-hub satellite communcations (SATCOM) terminal capable of operating on four Super High Frequency (SHF) bands on both military and commercial satellites. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Allison Payne)

51st Communications Squadron Airmen examine and operate a Very Small Aperture Antenna (VSAT) during a resiliency exercise Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021.

51st Communications Squadron Airmen examine and operate a Very Small Aperture Antenna (VSAT) during a resiliency exercise Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021. The resiliency exercise, referred to as COMMREX 21-3, consisted of Airmen testing stationary and deployable communications capabilities. The VSAT is a small-sized earth station used in the transmit and receive of data, voice and video signals over a satellite communication network, excluding broadcast television. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Allison Payne)

Senior Airman Weston Gerringer, 51st Communications Squadron radio frequency transmission technician, takes apart a Hawkeye III at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021.

Senior Airman Weston Gerringer, 51st Communications Squadron radio frequency transmission technician, takes apart a Hawkeye III at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021. The Hawkeye III delivers high-speed data communications for Internet, VPN and video transmission. The exercise, also referred to as COMMREX 21-3, was a 7th Air Force directive to test the capabilities for deployable communications to extend network, data and voice services to expeditionary and battlefield forces within the Korean Theater of Operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Allison Payne)

Staff Sgt. Tyler McNaughton, 51st Communications Squadron radio frequency transmission supervisor, works on a Very Small Aperture Antenna (VSAT) during a resiliency exercise at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021.

Staff Sgt. Tyler McNaughton, 51st Communications Squadron radio frequency transmission supervisor, works on a Very Small Aperture Antenna (VSAT) during a resiliency exercise at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Oct. 6, 2021. The resiliency exercise, referred to as COMMREX 21-3, consisted of Airmen testing the 51st Fighter Wing’s Communications Flyaway Kit (CFK). The Fly-Away Kit is designed to allow the user to maintain communications while on the move or at a stationary remote station. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Allison Payne)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --

The 51st Communications Squadron conducted a resiliency training event on Oct. 4-7, 2021, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The training, titled COMMREX 21-3, was a 7th Air Force directive to test the capabilities of deployable communications in order to extend network, data and voice services to expeditionary and battlefield forces within the Korean Theater of Operations.

 

“The purpose of the COMMREX 21-3 was to test the operational capabilities of our equipment,” said Senior Airman Weston Gerringer, 51st CS radio frequency transmission technician. “Basically, we can rapidly set up communications wherever designated and provide the necessary communication skills to get leaders their connections and any line of communication they may need. We can provide this through the CFK package.”

 

COMMREX 21-3 was designed to test and validate the 51st Fighter Wing’s Communications Flyaway Kit (CFK). The CFK enables users to maintain communications while on the move or at a stationary remote post.

 

“Having good communications is crucial, especially here in South Korea,” said Staff Sgt. Dean Sigismundo, 51st CS radio frequency transmission technician. “It provides our leadership the ability to take command and control during a contingency or emergency response. Without it, we are unable to coordinate with the other units across the peninsula, and commanders can’t get their messages out.”

 

Some benefits of the CFK include undetected two-way radio operation, discrete communication, private, non-scannable transmissions, choice of frequencies, choice between high or mid-power and a rugged custom-designed transportable case.

 

“A lot of the Airmen coming here, especially those straight from technical training school, don’t usually get to see this stuff firsthand, let alone have the opportunity to work with it. It’s good to see them out here rather than stuck in a classroom,” said Sigismundo.

 

In addition to testing the CFK, 51st CS Airmen also tested the Hawkeye III, which is essentially an expansion kit for the CFK. The Hawkeye III delivers high-speed data communications for Internet, VPN and video transmission. The modular design provides users the ability to switch between bands, apertures and modems with a simple swapping out of interchangeable kits.

 

“I’m proud and impressed with the Airmen’s performance,” said Sigismundo. “I’m confident if I needed them to set up comms at a moment’s notice we’d be able to set them up and not only meet the goal, but exceed it.”